Measles

Quick Links

Latest Updates

Frequently Asked Questions

Link to Ministry of Health site

Link to Safe Travel website

Latest Update

 

Update #4 - 19 March

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) is working with the University of Auckland after measles was confirmed in an 18 year old University student.

It is suspected this student acquired the illness overseas, therefore it is not linked to other cases. There have now been four measles cases in Auckland this year.

The number of confirmed measles cases in Canterbury now stands at 30, with one under investigation.

Northland does not have an outbreak of Measles, and we DO NOT want one.

The best way to prevent measles is to be immunised on time, with two free MMR vaccinations for all children at 15 months and four years. Two doses of MMR vaccine are at least 97 percent effective in preventing measles.

We do not recommend that toddlers under four get their second MMR early unless there is a clear indication for it, such as heading overseas, especially to a high-risk country (Philippines especially).

If you think you have the measles, it’s important to call before visiting your doctor to avoid spreading the virus in the waiting room. If you catch measles you're infectious from 5 days before and until 5 days after the rash appears.

 

Update #3 - 15 March 

We do not currently have an outbreak of Measles in Northland and we DO NOT want one. 

We need to maintain delivery of the MMR vaccination at ages 15 months and 4 years and ensure that children are up to date with all their vaccinations.  The best way to prevent measles is to be immunised on time, with two free MMR vaccinations for all children at 15 months and four years. Two doses of MMR vaccine are at least 97 percent effective in preventing measles.

We do not recommend that toddlers under four get their second MMR early unless there is a clear indication for it, such as heading overseas, especially to a high-risk country (Philippines especially).

If you think you have the measles, it’s important to call before visiting your doctor to avoid spreading the virus in the waiting room. If you catch measles you're infectious from 5 days before and until 5 days after the rash appears.

 

Update #2 - 14 March 2019 - Ministry of Health

There have now been 28 cases of measles confirmed in Canterbury, two cases in Dunedin and two isolated cases in Auckland. There has also been a recent outbreak in the Waikato this year and Dr Caroline McElnay, Director of Public Health at the Ministry of Health, warns there are also a number of international outbreaks. More cases of measles are therefore likely.

Update #1 - 14 March 2019

At least 27 people in the Canterbury region have already contracted measles, with a further 20 suspected cases being checked.

There are currently three confirmed cases of measles in Auckland, so measles is circulating in New Zealand, meaning it is only a matter of time before it arrives in Northland.

 

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness, that can be very serious. It is prevented by the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination.

Measles is caused by a virus and is easily spread from person to person. Both children and adults can get measles, and it can be very serious. A third of people with measles get ear infections, pneumonia (an infection in the lungs), or diarrhoea (loose, watery poo). Very bad cases of measles need treatment in hospital and some people can die from measles.

Your family/whānau’s best protection against measles is to be immunised against it. Protection from measles is part of the free MMR vaccinations given to children at 15 months and four years of age. If you think you or your child may not have had these vaccinations, see your doctor.

If you are concerned about measles call Healthline on 0800 611 116 or see your doctor or practice nurse.

 

Vaccines: Cameron Case Study

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6t3g29erg9I

Page information source: Auckland Regional Public Health Service

 

 

Measles: a quick guide Q&A

 

Please note the following section of content is possibly being delivered from an external source (IFRAME in HTML terms), and may present unusual experiences for screen readers.

Last modified: